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08/01/2017

Albumine: Bon pour la coagulopathie ?

Does small-volume resuscitation with crystalloids or colloids influence hemostasis and survival of rabbits subjected to lethal uncontrolled hemorrhage?

 
 
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Une publication qui complète celle publiée (ici) par la même équipe sur l'intérêt de l'albumine concentrée.
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BACKGROUND:

Prehospital, small-volume resuscitation of combat casualties with a synthetic colloid (6% hydroxyethyl starch [HES] 670/0.75) has been recommended when blood or blood components are unavailable. We studied hemostatic effects of a newer synthetic colloid (6% HES, 130/0.4) compared with either a natural colloid (albumin) or to crystalloids in an uncontrolled hemorrhage model.

METHODS:

Spontaneously breathing New Zealand white rabbits (3.4 ± 0.1 kg) were anesthetized, instrumented, and subjected to a splenic injury with uncontrolled bleeding. Fifteen minutes after injury, rabbits were in shock (mean arterial pressure [MAP] = 26 ± 1.3 mm Hg, and received colloids (6% HES, 130/0.4 or 5% albumin at 15 mL/kg), or crystalloids (normal saline at 30 mL/kg or 5% hypertonic saline at 7.5 mL/kg) for resuscitation in two intravenous bolus injections (15 minutes apart) to raise their MAP to 65 mm Hg, n = 9/group. Animals were monitored for 2.5 hours or until death, and blood losses were measured. Blood samples were analyzed for arterial blood gas, complete blood count, and coagulation measures.

RESULTS:

There were no differences among groups in baseline measures and initial hemorrhage volume (11.9 ± 0.6 mL/kg) at 15 minutes postinjury. Twenty minutes after fluid resuscitation (1 hour postinjury), MAP was higher, shock indices were lower, and blood pH was higher in colloids versus crystalloids groups (p < 0.05). Administration of 6% HES 130/0.4 colloid produced the largest hemodilution (54% decrease in hematocrit, p < 0.05 vs. hypertonic saline). Activated partial thromboplastin time increased approximately 35% above baseline in all groups except in 6% HES 130/0.4 group in which it doubled. Clot strength was reduced (15%) only in the 6% HES 130/0.4 group. 6% HES 130/0.4 resuscitation produced the largest blood loss and 33% survival rate that was not different than the crystalloid groups. Albumin produced the best hemostatic and survival outcomes (78%).

CONCLUSION:

Small-volume resuscitation with crystalloids appeared inadequate to treat hypovolemic shock and prevent death. 6% HES 130/0.4 was effective hemodynamically but detrimental to hemostasis. Albumin produced the best outcomes consistent with our previous observations. Further studies are needed to prove benefit of albumin solution as a possible resuscitation fluid for treating combat casualties at the point of injury.

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