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Albumine: Bon pour la coagulopathie ?

Does small-volume resuscitation with crystalloids or colloids influence hemostasis and survival of rabbits subjected to lethal uncontrolled hemorrhage?

Une publication qui complète celle publiée (ici) par la même équipe sur l'intérêt de l'albumine concentrée.


Prehospital, small-volume resuscitation of combat casualties with a synthetic colloid (6% hydroxyethyl starch [HES] 670/0.75) has been recommended when blood or blood components are unavailable. We studied hemostatic effects of a newer synthetic colloid (6% HES, 130/0.4) compared with either a natural colloid (albumin) or to crystalloids in an uncontrolled hemorrhage model.


Spontaneously breathing New Zealand white rabbits (3.4 ± 0.1 kg) were anesthetized, instrumented, and subjected to a splenic injury with uncontrolled bleeding. Fifteen minutes after injury, rabbits were in shock (mean arterial pressure [MAP] = 26 ± 1.3 mm Hg, and received colloids (6% HES, 130/0.4 or 5% albumin at 15 mL/kg), or crystalloids (normal saline at 30 mL/kg or 5% hypertonic saline at 7.5 mL/kg) for resuscitation in two intravenous bolus injections (15 minutes apart) to raise their MAP to 65 mm Hg, n = 9/group. Animals were monitored for 2.5 hours or until death, and blood losses were measured. Blood samples were analyzed for arterial blood gas, complete blood count, and coagulation measures.


There were no differences among groups in baseline measures and initial hemorrhage volume (11.9 ± 0.6 mL/kg) at 15 minutes postinjury. Twenty minutes after fluid resuscitation (1 hour postinjury), MAP was higher, shock indices were lower, and blood pH was higher in colloids versus crystalloids groups (p < 0.05). Administration of 6% HES 130/0.4 colloid produced the largest hemodilution (54% decrease in hematocrit, p < 0.05 vs. hypertonic saline). Activated partial thromboplastin time increased approximately 35% above baseline in all groups except in 6% HES 130/0.4 group in which it doubled. Clot strength was reduced (15%) only in the 6% HES 130/0.4 group. 6% HES 130/0.4 resuscitation produced the largest blood loss and 33% survival rate that was not different than the crystalloid groups. Albumin produced the best hemostatic and survival outcomes (78%).


Small-volume resuscitation with crystalloids appeared inadequate to treat hypovolemic shock and prevent death. 6% HES 130/0.4 was effective hemodynamically but detrimental to hemostasis. Albumin produced the best outcomes consistent with our previous observations. Further studies are needed to prove benefit of albumin solution as a possible resuscitation fluid for treating combat casualties at the point of injury.

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